All posts by Sarah

Nature Photography Exhibit!

An Exhibit of photographic nature art by Connecticut native George Ostertag will be featured at the Elihu Burritt library at Central Connecticut State University during the month of June 2010.

The framed photographic art will include images of wildlife, waterfalls, wildflowers, and scenic views of well-known areas and national landmarks in various parts of the country.

ostertag-12The photographer has had the unique opportunity to capture many spectacular scenes while researching material for more than 23 hiking, outdoor recreation, travel guides, and photography books (for which he is the sole photographer and the co-author with his wife Rhonda Ostertag).  Some of their books, including many second edition copies, will also be on exhibit.

George has put together an extensive photo stock celebrating the American West and, more recently, many Eastern states. Wherever boot and backpack would take him, he took camera and tripod.  Diverse landscapes opened up unlimited photo opportunities with humbling deserts, rich forests, rocky coasts, waterfalls, and high mountains. A geologist by training and naturalist by heart, he finds beauty in all habitats.

His photography has been displayed at numerous galleries and has appeared in many publications.  His images have graced calendars, greeting cards, and postcards, many of which will be on display during this exhibit.
For additional information contact exhibitor Agnes Ostertag at 860 223-3723.

American Antiquarian Society (AAS) Trial Subsciption Now Available

Trial Access to the AAS Historical Periodicals Collections is available until June 30th. Series 1 covers the period 1693-1820, and Series 2 covers 1821-1837.

The AAS Historical Periodicals Collection presents over 1,500 titles. The collection represents over two centuries of print culture, ranging from early works imported by the colonists to later titles published on American soil on the eve of the Revolution and during the early republic. These periodical collections are the first two in a series of five created from periodical holdings belonging to one of the premier repositories in the United States, the American Antiquarian Society.

“When Humanity Fails” Exhibit April 19-23, 2010

When Humanity Fails

The exhibit “When Humanity Fails”, brought to campus by the Hillel Jewish Student Organization, fills the growing schism that is arising between the dying generation of survivors and the new generation of youth that is struggling to comprehend the depths of evil that abounded in the Holocaust. While Holocaust education has certainly grown in importance, the method by which it is taught focuses on the death and destruction without teaching students about the lessons that can be learned and how their emotional and intellectual responses can be channeled into constructive action and awareness.

When humanity fails exhibit photoWe hope bringing this exhibit to campus will create a more open, informed and tolerant community. More information can be found by contacting Pam Majify at ccsuhillel@hotmail.com or on the exhibits website www.whenhumanityfails.com.

We hope to see you there and at future Hillel programming.

Now on Display: Interpretations

exhibit-interpretations-001Works at the exhibit reflect an effort to create a variety of solutions to the same problem. The eight interpretations of a single theme are offered.

I have always found it fascinating that a group of people can stand in a room and paint the same subject. The result is always a vast array of solutions to a problem.

Art making is about problem solving. What should I paint? What color should go on after blue? What is important in the composition? Am I communicating what I started out wanting to communicate? The entire process is a mystery that evokes input.

The original image is a scene from riverside location in NJ. The composition was of interest because it provided many intimate spaces behind docks and under trees. It is important to give a viewer places to explore on canvas.exhibit-interpretations-002

The Artist:

Josa Weaterwax is a fine and decorative artist who provides artwork and murals for residential and commercial clients.

For more information please visit: josastudios.com

From Her Hands: Latin American Textile Art

“From Her Hands: Latin American Textile Art” opened at CCSU’s Burritt Library on February 1, 2010. This exhibit showcases three Latin American textile art forms handcrafted by women. They are Chilean arpilleras, Panamanian molas and Guatemalan weavings. The exhibit runs through the month of February.

Latin American Textile Art
Latin American Textile Art

Arpilleras are hand sewn of cotton. They are backed by burlap, called ‘arpillera’ in Spanish. These three dimensional appliqué textiles depict the history of Chile and the dictatorship of General Augusto Pinochet in chilling detail. Scenes of torture, interment, and exile are juxtaposed with scenes of grief, loneliness, protest and, ultimately, happiness that the dictatorship has come to an end. The centerpiece is a 29” by 76” quilt portraying a complete history of the country. The display is accompanied by quotes and a poem from Dr. Marjorie Agosín, whose collection is on loan to the library.

Molas are beautifully hand sewn reverse appliqué art created by the Kuna of Panamá. The molas are both sewn and worn by Kuna women and girls. They depict daily life, spirituality and folk tales of the Kuna. Photographs by Dr. Galen Frysinger and information accompany this display, on loan from the collection of Carol Brault.

Guatemalan weavings, the traditional dress of Maya women, are created on a backstrap loom. They demonstrate craftsmanship excellence. The huipil, or traditional blouse, of Santiago de Atitlán is hand embroidered with birds and flowers. Photographs, information and books accompany the display on this subject. It is on loan from the collections of Carol Brault and Dr. Abigail Adams.

Latin American Textile Art
Latin American Textile Art

Dr. Marjorie Agosín, a noted expert on Chilean Arpilleras, will speak in the Library’s Special Collections Room on February 17, 2010 at 4PM. She will discuss the Pinochet regime and its influence on the women who created arpilleras. A slide show and refreshments will accompany the lecture.

Rex Brasher’s Birds and Trees of North America

Rex Brasher’s Birds and Trees of North America is currently on display on the main level of the Burritt Library.

Rex Brasher was an American artist who produced a set of books entitled The Birds and Trees of North America in the 1930’s.  Brasher was born in Brooklyn, NY in 1869, and by the age of 16 he started painting birds in their natural surroundings.  He traveled to every corner of the North American continent and by 1924, after painting thousands of birds, considered his task done.Rex Brasher  Sea Gull

Mr. Brasher purchased a farm in Kent, Connecticut in 1911, where he continued to work.  When his eyesight failed him, two years before his death in 1960, he stopped painting.  Brasher’s work contains 875 painted prints of over 1200 species and subspecies of North American birds. Brasher could not afford to print his work in color, therefore he ordered black and white prints and then, using an airbrush and a stencil, hand colored each plate.

There were 100 sets of 12 volumes of The Birds and Trees of North America produced, including almost 90,000 hand colored reproductions. Burritt library currently exhibits volume 1 out of 12 volumes which are housed at the Special Collections department.

Volunteering in NOLA

Sarah with the floor sander

I returned recently from a trip to the great city of New Orleans. The main objective of the trip was to help rebuild houses in the Lower Ninth Ward, an area that was ravaged by floods in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina.This area was particularly hard hit, and many residents had water up to their rooftops. Two and a half years later most of the area is still in need of repair and since only 10% of the population has returned, much of the area feels like a ghost town.

We (my husband and I) were able to volunteer with an organization called lowernine.org, which is a non-profit group that assists with placing volunteers in area homes that need repair, along with offering assistance to the homeowners of the area.The amazing people of this organization also provide a place to sleep and food to eat to their many volunteers. In addition they teach volunteers the skills they need to drywall or frame buildings or whatever may arise. I was able to learn how to tile floors and backsplashes while I was there.

The best part of the whole experience was getting to meet the homeowners.One morning I was dropped off at one of the houses, and was immediately greeted with a giant hug and thank you by a lovely woman whose home was near completion. On another occasion, I witnessed an owner start to well up with tears as the realization that he and his family would soon be able to move back into their home dawned on him. On the whole it was a fantastic experience, and I am hoping to go back for some more renovation projects in October.

You can find out more at www.lowernine.org

If you would like to see the photos let me know!